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Most Expensive Places in the World For Wine

Most Expensive Places in the World For Wine


While wine lovers have been known to flock to France to load up the car with bottles of quality wine at a cheaper price to stock up the wine cellar, there are some places in the world that fans of this drink should avoid if they don’t want to spend big money on each glass.

The 2018 Cost of Living Index, released by The Economist Intelligence Unit has recently ranked every country in the world on how expensive it is to live there. Prices of a variety of products and services, from bills to booze, were analysed in the report and the top ten most expensive cities for buying a bottle of wine have been revealed. For the purposes of this report, the price was taken from a standard 750ml bottle of table wine.

10. Geneva

While ranking in sixth place overall for the cost of living in this city, Geneva takes tenth place for the cost of their wine. In 2018, a standard bottle of table wine cost £6.43 in Geneva. For wine, this isn’t a particularly high fee per bottle, but when combined with the other high prices in this city, we’re sure it adds up fast!

 

9. Paris

Although France is renowned for having great prices for its quality wines, the capital city sees somewhat steeper price tags for their bottles! A bottle of table wine in Paris will cost you around £9.15. Interestingly, this is the biggest price increase for wine globally, with the cost of a bottle in the city rising by 15 percent in 2018, in comparison to 2017. 

8. Copenhagen

If you’re looking for a nice glass of wine in Copenhagen, then expect to pay around £10.21 for the pleasure. Overall, Copenhagen was ranked in eighth place for the cost of living, which matches its ranking for the price of wine!

7. Oslo

Oslo is already renowned for having pricey beverages, with a pint of beer costing around £7. The same can be said for their wine, with a bottle of table wine costing £10.53. While this is more than it cost in 2017, the average price has actually dropped in the past ten years, as a decade ago a similar bottle of wine would have cost around £12.60.  

6. Zurich 

Ranking in sixth place, Zurich is currently the most expensive city in Europe for a glass of wine. At present, the average price for a table wine is £12.21. Like Paris, Zurich has also seen a fairly big increase in the cost of wine, with prices rising by 12.1% since last year.

5. Hong Kong

Cities in Asia are often known for their higher costs of living, and the same can be said for the price of their wine, with three out of the top five places being in this area of the world. In Hong Kong, the price of a bottle of wine is £12.42. 

4. Sydney

Sydney is surrounded by some of the best wine regions in Australia, and as one of the largest cities in Australia, that is also a popular tourist destination, it is perhaps not surprising that wine prices are a little higher than most in this area. A bottle of table wine can be bought for £15.75 here. 

3. Singapore

Singapore has been named the most expensive city in the world to live in five years in a row; however, it does not quite top the list of most expensive places to buy wine! In 2018, a bottle of wine would set you back £18.20. Interestingly, this was the only place on the list that didn’t see a price increase from last year.

2. Seoul

Seoul, the capital city of South Korea, makes the third Asian country on the list (and in the top five). If you were to buy a bottle of wine here, you would have to pay £20.77.

1. Tel Aviv

The most expensive city in the world for wine is Tel Aviv, Israel’s coastal city. Drinking a bottle of wine in this city would cost you £22.11. While this is 3.6 percent more than last year, the price of wine in Tel Aviv has been seen to skyrocket over the past ten years, with wine costing around £10 less (£12.72) in 2009. 

What do you think of these prices? Leave a comment below and let us know if you’ve visited any of these places and bought wine there!


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